Kafka in IT: How a Simple Change Can Take a Year to Implement

Public sector IT has never had a reputation of being particularly fast-moving or responsive. In fact, it seems to have a reputation for being staffed by apathetic under-skilled workers toiling away in basements and boiler rooms supporting legacy, “mission-critical”, monolithic applications that sit half-finished and half-deployed by their long-gone and erstwhile overpaid contractors (*cough* Deloitte, CGI *cough*). This topic might seem familiar… Budget Cuts and Consolidation and Are GOV IT teams apathetic?

Why do things move so slow, especially in a field that demands the opposite? I don’t have an answer to that larger question but I do have an object lesson, well maybe what I really have is part-apology, part-explanation and part-catharsis. Gather around and hear The tale of how a single change to our organization’s perimeter proxy devices took a year!

 

03/10

We get a ticket stating that one of our teams’ development servers is no longer letting them access it via UNC share or RDP. I assign one of our tier-2 guys to take a look and a few days later it gets escalated to me. The server will not respond to any incoming network traffic, but if I access it via console and send traffic out it magically works. This smells suspiciously like a host-based firewall acting up but our security team swears up and down our Host Intrusion Protection software is in “detect” mode and I verified that we have disabled the native Windows firewall. I open up a few support tickets with our vendors and start chasing such wild geese as a layer-2 disjoint in our UCS fabric and “asymmetric routing” issues. No dice. Eventually someone gets the smart idea to move the IP address to another VM to try and narrow the issue down to either the VM or the environment. It’s the VM (of course it is)! These shenanigans take two weeks.

04/01

I finish re-platforming the development server onto a new Server 2012 R2 virtual machine. This in-of-itself would be worth a post since the best way I can summarize our deployment methodology is “guess-and-check”. Anyway, the immediate issue is now resolved. YAY!

05/01

I rebuild the entire development, testing, staging and production stack and migrate everything over except the production server which is publically accessible. The dev team wants to do a soft cutover instead of just moving the IP address to the new server. This means we will need have our networking team make some changes to the proxy perimeter devices.

05/15

I catch up on other work and finish the roughly ten pages of forms, diagrams and a security plan that are required for a perimeter device change request.

06/06

I open a ticket upstream, discuss the change with the network team and make some minor modifications to the ticket.

06/08

I filled out the wrong forms and/or I filled them out incorrectly. Whoops.

06/17

After a few tries I get the right forms and diagrams filled out. The ticket gets assigned to the security team for approval.

06/20

Someone from the security team picks up the ticket and begins to review it.

07/06

Sweet! Two weeks later my change request gets approval from the security team (that’s actually pretty fast). The ticket gets transfered back to the networking team which begins to work on implementation.

07/18

I create a separate ticket to track the required SSL/TLS certificate I will need for the HTTPS-enabled services on the server. This ticket follows a similar parallel process, documentation is filled out and validated, goes to the security team for approval and then back to the networking team for implementation. My original ticket for the perimeter change is still being worked on.

08/01

A firmware upgrade on the perimeter devices breaks high availability. The network team freezes all new work until the issue is corrected (they start their internal change control process for emergency break/fix issues).

08/24

The server’s HTTPS certificate has to be replaced before it expires at the end of the month. Our dev’s business group coughs up the few hundred dollars. We had planned to use the perimeter proxies’ wildcard certificate for no extra cost but oh well, too late.

09/06

HA restored! Wonderful! New configuration changes are released to the networking team for implementation.

10/01

Nothing happens upstream… I am not sure why.  I call about once a week and hear, we are swamped, two weeks until implementation. Should be soon.

11/03

The ticket gets transferred to another member of the network team and within a week the configuration change is ready for testing.

11/07

The dev team discovers an issue. Their application is relying on the originating client IP address for logging and what basically amounts to “two-factor authentication” (i.e., a username is tied to an IP address). This breaks fantastically once the service gets moved behind a web proxy. Neat.

11/09

I work with the dev lead and the networking team to come up with a solution. Turns out we can pass the originating IP address through the proxies but it changes the variable server-side that their code needs to reference.

11/28

Business leaders say that the code change is a no-go. We are about to hit their “code/infrastructure freeze” period that last from December to April. Fair enough.

12/01

We hit the code freeze. Things open back up again in mid-April. Looking ahead, I already have infrastructure work scheduled late April and early May which brings us right around to June: one year.

EDIT: The change was committed on 05/30 and we passed our rollback period on 06/14. As of 06/19 I just submitted the last ticket to our networking team to remove the legacy configuration.

 

*WHEW* Let’s take a break. Here’s doge to entertain you during the intermission:

 

My team is asking for a change that involves taking approximately six services that are already publically accessible via a legacy implementation, moving those services to a single IP address and placing an application proxy between the Big Bad Internet and the hosting servers. Nothing too crazy here.

Here’s some parting thoughts to ponder.

  • ITIL. Love it or hate it ITIL adds a lot of drag. I hope it adds some value.
  • I don’t mean to pick on the other teams but it clearly seems like they don’t have enough resources (expertise, team members, whatever they need they don’t have enough of it).
  • I could have done better with all the process stuff on my end. Momentum is important so I probably should not of let some of that paperwork sit for as long as it did.
  • The specialization of teams cuts both ways. It is easy to slip from being isolated and silo-ed to just basic outright distrust, and when you assume that everyone is out to get you (probably because that’s what experience has taught you) then you C.Y.A. ten times till Sunday to protect yourself and your team. Combine this with ITIL for a particularly potent blend of bureaucratic misery.
  • Centralized teams like networking and security that are not embedded in different business groups end up serving a whole bunch of different masters. All of whom are going in different directions and want different things. In our organization this seems to mean that the loudest, meanest person who is holding their feet to the SLA gets whatever they want at the expense of their quieter customers like myself.
  • Little time lags magnify delay as the project goes on. Two weeks in security approval limbo puts me four weeks behind a few months down the road which means I then miss my certificate expiry deadline which then means I need to fill out another ticket which then puts me further behind and so on ad infinitum.
  • This kind of shit is why developers are just saying “#YOLO! Screw you Ops! LEEEEROY JENKINS! We are moving to the Cloud!” and ignoring all this on-prem, organizational pain and doing DevDev (it’s like DevOps but it leads to hilarious brokenness in other new and exciting ways).
  • Public Sector IT runs on chaos, disorder and the frustrations of people just trying to Do Things. See anything ever written by Kafka.
  • ITIL. I thought it was worth mentioning twice because that’s how much overhead it adds (by design).

 

Until next time, may your tickets be speedily resolved.

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