Salary, Expectations and Automation

It has been an interesting few months. We have had a few unexpected projects pop up and I have ended up owning most of them. This led to me feel pretty beaten down and a little bit demoralized. I don’t like missing deadlines and I don’t like constantly switching from one task to the next without ever making headway. It’s not my preferred way to work.

One thing that I am continually trying to remind myself is that I should use the team. I don’t have to own everything nor should I so I started creating tickets on the behalf of my users (we don’t have a policy requiring tickets) and just dumping them into our generic queue so someone else could pick them up.

Guess what happened? They sat there. Now there are a few reasons why things played out this way (see this post) but you can imagine this was not the result I was hoping for. I was hoping my tier-2 folks would of jumped in and grabbed some of these requests:

  • Review the GPOs applied to a particular group of servers and modify them to accommodate a new service account
  • Review some NTFS permissions and restructure them to be more granular
  • Create a new IIS site along with the corresponding certificate and coordinate with our AD team to get the appropriate DNS records put in place
  • Help one of our dev teams re-platform / upgrade a COTS application
  • Re-configure IIS on a particular site to support HTTPS.

Part of the reason we have so much work right now is that we are assuming the responsibility for a department that previously had their own internal IT staff (Yay! Budget cuts!). Not everyone was happy with giving up “their IT guys” and so during our team meetings we started reviewing work in the queue that was not getting moved along.

A bunch of these unloved tickets were “mine”, that is to say, they were originally requests that came directly to me, that I then created a ticket for hoping to bump it back into the queue. This should sound familiar. The consensus though was that it was “my work” and that I was not being diligent enough in keeping track of the ticket queue.

Please bear in mind for the next two paragraphs, that we have a small 12 person team. It is not difficult for us to get a hold of another team member.

I’ll unpack the latter idea first. In a sense, I agree. I could do a better job of watching the queue but that’s simply because I was not watching it. My perception was, that as someone who is nominally at the top of our support tier is that our help desk watches the queue, catches interrupts from customers and then escalates stuff if they need assistance. I was thinking my tickets should come from my team and not directly from the queue.

The former idea I’m a little less sympathetic too. It’s not “my work”, it’s the team’s work, right? And here is where those sour grapes start to ferment… that list of tickets up there does not seem like “tier-3 work” to me. It seems junior sysadmins’ work. If that is not the case then I have to ask the question: What are those guys doing instead? If that’s not “work” that tier-1/tier-2 handle then what is?

In the end, of course, I took the tickets and did the work, which of course put me even further behind on some of my projects.

I have puzzled over our ticket system, support process and team dynamics quite a bit (see here, here and here) and there is a lot of different threads one could pull on, but a new explanation came to mind after this exercise: Maybe our tier-2 guys are not doing this work because they can’t? Maybe they just don’t have the skills to do those kinds of things and maybe it’s not realistic to expect people to have that level of skill, independence and work ethic for what we pay them? I hate this idea. I hate it because if that’s truly the case there is very little I can do to fix it. I don’t control our training budget or assign team priorities or have any ability to negotiate graduated raises matched with a corresponding training plan. I don’t do employee evaluations and I cannot put someone on an improvement plan and I certainly cannot let an employee go. But I really don’t like this idea because it feels like I’m crapping on my team. I don’t like it because it makes me feel guilty.

But our are salaries and expectations unrealistic?

  • Help Desk Staff (Tier-1) – $44k  – $50k per year
  • Junior Sysadmins (Tier-2) – $58k – $68 per year
  • Sysadmins (Tier-3) – $68k – 78k per year

It’s a pretty normal “white collar” setup: salaried, no overtime eligibility, with health insurance and a 401k with a decent employer match. We can’t really do flexible work schedules or work-from-home but we do have a pretty generous paid leave policy. However – this is Alaska, where everything is as expensive as the scenery is beautiful. A one bedroom rental will run you at least $1200 a month plus utilities which can easily be a few hundred dollars in the winter depending on your heating source. Gasoline is on average a dollar more per gallon than whatever it is currently in the Lower 48. Childcare is about $1100 a month per kiddo for kids under three. Your standard “American dream” three bedroom, two bath house will cost you around $380,000. All things being equal, it is about 25% more expensive to live here than your average American city so when you think about these wages knock a quarter of them off to adjust for cost of living.

Those wages don’t look so hot anymore huh? Maybe there is a reason (other than our State’s current recession) that most IT positions in my organization take at least six months to fill. The talent pool is shallow and not that many people are interested in wading in.

We all have our strengths and weaknesses. I suspect our team is much like others with a spectrum of talent but I think the cracks are beginning to show… as positions are cut, work is not being evenly distributed and fewer and fewer team members are taking more and more of the work. I suspect that’s because these team members have to skills to eat that workload with automation. They can use PowerShell to do account provisioning instead of clicking through Active Directory Users and Computes. They can use SCCM to install Visio instead of RDPing and pressing Next-Next-Finish on each computer. A high performing team member would realize that the only way they could do that much work was learn some automation skills. A low performing team member would do what instead? I’m not sure. But maybe, just maybe, as we put increasing pressure on our tier-1 and tier-2 staff to “up their skills” and to “eat the work”, we are not being realistic.

Would you expect someone making 44k – 51k a year in Cost of Living adjusted wages to be an SCCM wizard? Or pickup PowerShell?

Are we asking to much of our staff? What would you expect someone paid these wags to be able to do? Like all my posts – I have no answers, only questions but hopefully I’m asking the right ones.

Until next time, stay frosty!