Morale Is Low, Workload Is Up

Earlier this month, I came back from lunch and I could tell something was off. One of my team members, lets call her Elaine, who is by far the the most upbeat, relentlessly optimistic and quickest to laugh off any of our daily trials and tribulations was silent, hurriedly moving around and uncharacteristically short with customers and coworkers. Maybe she was having a bad day I wondered as I made a mental note to keep tabs on her for the week to see if she bounced back to her normal self. When her attitude didn’t change after a few days then I was really worried.

Time to earn my team lead stripes so I took her aside and asked her what’s up. I could hear the steam venting as she started with, “I’m just so f*****g busy”. I decided to shut up and listen as she continued. There was a lot to unpack: She was under-pressure to redesign our imaging process to incorporate a new department that got rolled under us, she was handling the majority of our largely bungled Office 365 Exchange Online post-migration support and she was still crushing tickets on the help desk with the best of them. The straw that broke the camel’s back – spending a day to clean-up her cubicle that was full of surplus equipment because someone commented that our messy work area looked unprofessional…  “I don’t have time for unimportant s**t like that right now!” as she continued furiously cleaning.

The first thing I did and asked her what the high priority task of the afternoon was and figured out how to move it somewhere else. Next I recommended that she finish her cleaning, take off early and then take tomorrow off. When someone is that worked up, myself included, generally a great place to start is to get some distance between you and whatever is stressing you out until you decompress a bit.

Next I started looking through our ticket system to see if I could get some supporting information about her workload that I could take to our manager.

Huh. Not a great trend.

That’s an interesting uptick that just so happens to coincide with us taking over the support responsibilities for the previously mentioned department. We did bring their team of four people over but only managed to retain two in the process. Our workload increased substantially too since we not only had to continue to the maintain the same service level but we now have the additional challenge of performing discovery, taking over the administration and standardizing their systems (I have talked about balancing consolidation projects and workload before). It was an unfortunate coincidence that we had to schedule our Office 365 migration at the same time due to a scheduling conflict. Bottom line: We increased our workload by a not insignificant amount and lost two people. Not great a start.

I wonder how our new guys (George and Susan) are doing? Lets take a look at the ticket distribution, shall we?

Huh. Also not a great trend.

Back in December 2016 it looks like Elaine started taking on more and more of the team’s tickets. August of 2017 was clearly a rough month for the team as we started eating through all that additional workload but noticeably that workload was not being distributed evenly.

Here is another view that I think really underlines the point.

Yeah. That sucks for Elaine.

As far back as a year Elaine has been handling about 25% of our tickets and since then her percentage of the tickets has increased to close to 50%. What makes this worse is not only has the absolute quantity of tickets in August more than doubled compared to the average of the 11 preceding months but the relative percentage of her contribution has doubled as well. This is bad and I should of noticed, a long time ago.

Elaine and I had a little chat about this situation and here’s what I distilled out of it:

  • “If I don’t take the tickets they won’t get done”
  • “I’m the one that learns new stuff as it comes along so then I’m the one that ends up supporting it”
  • “There’s too many user requests for me to get my project work done quickly”

Service Delivery and Business Processes. A foe beyond any technical lead.

This is where my power as a technical lead ends. It takes a manager or possibly even an executive to address these issues but I can do my best to advocate for my team.

The first issue is actually simple. Elaine needs to stop taking it upon herself to own the majority of the tickets. If the tickets aren’t in the queue then no one else will have the opportunity to take them. If the tickets linger, that’s not Elaine’s problem, that’s a service delivery problem for a manager to solve.

The second issue is a little harder since it is fundamentally about the ability of staff to learn as they go, be self-motivated and be OK with just jumping into a technology without any real guidance or training. Round after round of budget cuts has decimated our training budget and increased our tempo to point where cross training and knowledge sharing is incredibly difficult. I routinely hear, “I don’t know anything about X. I never had any training on X. How am I supposed to fix X!” from team members and as sympathetic as I am about how crappy of a situation that is there is nothing I can do about it. The days of being an “IT guy” that can go down The Big Blue Runbook of Troubleshooting are over. Every day something new that you have never seen before is broken and you just have to figure it out.

Elaine is right though – she is punching way above her weight, the result of which is that she owns more and more the support burden as technology changes and as our team fails to evenly adopt the change. A manager could request some targeted training or maybe some force augmentation from another agency or contracting services. Neither are particularly likely outcomes given our budget unfortunately.

The last one is a perennial struggle of the sysadmin: Your boss judges your efficacy by your ability to complete projects, your users (and thus your boss’ peers via the chain of command) judge your efficacy by your responsiveness to service requests. These two standards are in direct competition. This is such as common and complicated problem that there is a fantastic book about it: Time Management for Systems Administrators

The majority of the suggestions to help alleviate this problem require management buy-in and most of them our shop doesn’t have: A easy to use ticket system with notification features, a policy stating that tickets are the method of requesting support in all but the most exigent of circumstances, a true triage system, a rotating interrupt blocker position and so on. The best I can do here is to recommend to Elaine to develop some time management skills, work on healthy coping skills (exercise, walking, taking breaks, etc.) and doing regular one-on-one sessions with our manager so Elaine has a venue for discussing these frustrations privately so at least if they cannot be solved they can acknowledged.

I brought a sanitized version of this to our team manager and we made some substantial progress. He reminded me that George and Susan have only been on our team for a month and that it will take some time for them to come up to speed before they can really start eating through the ticket queue. He also told Elaine, that while her tenacity in the ticket queue is admirable she needs to stop taking so many tickets so the other guys have a chance. If they linger, well, we can cross that bridge when we come to it.

The best we can do is wait and see. It’ll be interesting to see what happens as George and Susan adjust to our team and how well the strategy of leaving tickets unowned to encourage team members to grab them works out.

Until next time, stay frosty.

 

2 thoughts on “Morale Is Low, Workload Is Up

  1. JamieT

    Whoa, this one hit a nerve..Currnetly going through what “Elaine” was going through now..Thanks for the perspective.

    1. kce Post author

      Jamie – It has improved a bit. A big bump in the workload was friction caused by our less than ideal Office 365 migration and “George” and “Susan” have started to pick up a larger share of the workload but things are far from ideal. Then again with 40% reduction in staff we have to let go of “the old ways”. Things just won’t be the same with such a tremendous reduction in resources. I wish you best of luck.

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