Deploying VLC Media Player with SCCM

VLC Media Player is an F/OSS media player that supports a dizzying array of media formats. It’s a great example of one of those handy but infrequently used applications that are not included in our base image but generate help desk tickets when an user needs to view a live feed or listen to a meeting recording. Instead of just doing the Next-Next-Finish dance, lets package and deploy it out with SCCM. The 30 minutes to package, test and deploy VLC will pay us back in folds when our help desk no longer has to manually install the software. This reduces the time it takes to resolve these tickets and ensures that the application gets installed in a standardized way.

Start by grabbing the appropriate installer from VideoLAN’s website and copying to whatever location you use to store your source installers for SCCM. Then fire up the Administrative Console and create a New Application (Software Library – Applications – Create Application). We don’t get an .MSI installer so unfortunately we are actually going to have to do a bit of work, pick Manually specify the application information.

Next up, fill out all the relevant general information. There’s a tendency to skimp here but you might as well take the 10 seconds to provide some context and comments. You might save your team members or yourself some time in the future.

I generally make an effort to provide an icon for the Application Catalog and/or Software Center as well. Users may not know what “VLC Media Player” is but they may recognize the orange traffic cone. Again. It doesn’t take much up front work to prevent a few tickets.

Now you need to add a Deployment Type to your Application. Think of the Application as the metadata wrapped around your Deployment Types which are the actual installers. This lets you pull the logic for handling different types of clients, prerequisites and requirements away from other places like separate Collections for Windows 7 32-bit and 64-bit clients and just have one Application with two Deployment Types (a 32-bit installer and a 64-bit installer) that gets deployed to a more generic Collection. As previously mentioned, we don’t have an .MSI installer so we will have to manually specify the deployment installation/uninstallation strings along with the detection logic.

  • Installation: vlc-2.2.8-win32.exe /L=1033 /S –no-qt-privacy-ask –no-qt-updates-notif
  • Uninstallation: %ProgramFiles(x86)%\VideoLAN\VLC\uninstall.exe /S

If you review the VLC documentation you can see that /L switch specifies the language, /S switch specifies a silent install and the –no-qt-privacy-ask –no-qt-updates-notif sets the first-run settings so users don’t receive the prompt.

Without having a MSI’s handy ProductCode for setting up our Detection Logic we will have to rely on something a little more basic: Checking to see if the vlc.exe is present to tell the client whether or not the Application is actually installed. I also like to add a Version check as well so that older installs of VLC are not detected and are subsequently eligible for being upgraded.

  • Setting Type: File System
  • Type: File
  • Path: %ProgramFile(x86)%\VideoLAN\VLC
  • File or folder name: vlc.exe
  • Property: Version
  • Operator: Equals
  • Value: 2.2.8

Last but not least you need to set the User Experience settings. These are all pretty self explanatory. I do like to actually set the maximum run time and estimated installation time to something relevant for the application that way if the installer hangs it doesn’t just sit there for two hours before the agent kills it.

 

From there you should be able to test and deploy your new application! VLC Media Player is a great example of the kind of “optional” that you could just deploy as Available to your entire workstation fleet and close tickets requesting a media player with instructions on how to use the Software Center.

 

 

Until next time, stay frosty!