Tag Archives: package-magenement

Deploying VLC Media Player with SCCM

VLC Media Player is an F/OSS media player that supports a dizzying array of media formats. It’s a great example of one of those handy but infrequently used applications that are not included in our base image but generate help desk tickets when an user needs to view a live feed or listen to a meeting recording. Instead of just doing the Next-Next-Finish dance, lets package and deploy it out with SCCM. The 30 minutes to package, test and deploy VLC will pay us back in folds when our help desk no longer has to manually install the software. This reduces the time it takes to resolve these tickets and ensures that the application gets installed in a standardized way.

Start by grabbing the appropriate installer from VideoLAN’s website and copying to whatever location you use to store your source installers for SCCM. Then fire up the Administrative Console and create a New Application (Software Library – Applications – Create Application). We don’t get an .MSI installer so unfortunately we are actually going to have to do a bit of work, pick Manually specify the application information.

Next up, fill out all the relevant general information. There’s a tendency to skimp here but you might as well take the 10 seconds to provide some context and comments. You might save your team members or yourself some time in the future.

I generally make an effort to provide an icon for the Application Catalog and/or Software Center as well. Users may not know what “VLC Media Player” is but they may recognize the orange traffic cone. Again. It doesn’t take much up front work to prevent a few tickets.

Now you need to add a Deployment Type to your Application. Think of the Application as the metadata wrapped around your Deployment Types which are the actual installers. This lets you pull the logic for handling different types of clients, prerequisites and requirements away from other places like separate Collections for Windows 7 32-bit and 64-bit clients and just have one Application with two Deployment Types (a 32-bit installer and a 64-bit installer) that gets deployed to a more generic Collection. As previously mentioned, we don’t have an .MSI installer so we will have to manually specify the deployment installation/uninstallation strings along with the detection logic.

  • Installation: vlc-2.2.8-win32.exe /L=1033 /S –no-qt-privacy-ask –no-qt-updates-notif
  • Uninstallation: %ProgramFiles(x86)%\VideoLAN\VLC\uninstall.exe /S

If you review the VLC documentation you can see that /L switch specifies the language, /S switch specifies a silent install and the –no-qt-privacy-ask –no-qt-updates-notif sets the first-run settings so users don’t receive the prompt.

Without having a MSI’s handy ProductCode for setting up our Detection Logic we will have to rely on something a little more basic: Checking to see if the vlc.exe is present to tell the client whether or not the Application is actually installed. I also like to add a Version check as well so that older installs of VLC are not detected and are subsequently eligible for being upgraded.

  • Setting Type: File System
  • Type: File
  • Path: %ProgramFile(x86)%\VideoLAN\VLC
  • File or folder name: vlc.exe
  • Property: Version
  • Operator: Equals
  • Value: 2.2.8

Last but not least you need to set the User Experience settings. These are all pretty self explanatory. I do like to actually set the maximum run time and estimated installation time to something relevant for the application that way if the installer hangs it doesn’t just sit there for two hours before the agent kills it.

 

From there you should be able to test and deploy your new application! VLC Media Player is a great example of the kind of “optional” that you could just deploy as Available to your entire workstation fleet and close tickets requesting a media player with instructions on how to use the Software Center.

 

 

Until next time, stay frosty!

FFFUUUU Internet Explorer… a rant about an outage

I am not normally a proponent of hating on Microsoft, mostly because I think much of the hate they get for design decisions is simply because people do not take the time to understand how Microsoft’s new widget of the month works and why it works that way. I also think it is largely pointless. All Hardware Sucks, All Software Sucks once you really start to dig around under the hood. That and Microsoft doesn’t really give a shit about what you want and why you want it. If you are an enterprise customer they have you by the balls and you and Microsoft both know it. You are just going to have to deal with tiles, the Windows Store and all the other consumer centric bullshit that is coming your way regardless of how “enterprise friendly” your sales rep says Microsoft is.

That being said, I cannot always take my own medicine of enlightened apathy and Stockholm Syndrome and this is one of those times. We had a Windows Update get deployed this week that broke about 60% – 75% of our fleet, specifically Internet Explorer 11. Unfortunately we have a few line-of-business web applications that rely on it. You can imagine how that went.

Now there are a lot of reasons why this happened but midway through my support call where we are piecing together an uninstallation script to remove all the prerequisites of Internet Explorer 11 I had what I call a “boss epiphany”. A “boss epiphany” is when you step out your technical day-to-day and start asking bigger questions and is so named because my boss has a habit of doing this. I generally find it kind of annoying in a good-natured way because I feel like there is a disregard for the technical complexities that I have to deal with in order to make things work but I can’t begrudge that he cuts to the heart of the matter. And six hours into our outage what was the epiphany… “Why is this so fucking hard? We are using Microsoft’s main line-of-business browser (Internet Explorer) and their main line-of-business tool for managing workstations in an enterprise environment (SCCM).”

The answer is complicated from (my) technical perspective but the “boss epiphany” is a really good point. This shit should be easy. It’s not. Or I suck at it. Or maybe both. AND that brings me to my rant. Why in the name of Odin’s beard is software deployment and management in Windows so stupid? All SCCM is doing is really just running an installer. For all its “Enterprisy-ness” it just runs whatever stupid installer you get from Adobe, Microsoft or Oracle. There’s no standardization, no packaging or no guarantee anything will actually be atomic. Even MSI installers can do insane things – like accept arguments in long form (TRANSFROMS=stupidapp.mst) but not short form (/t stupidapp.mst) or my particular favorite, search for ProductKey registry keys to uninstall any older version of the application, and then try to uninstall it via the original .MSI. This fails horribly when that .MSI lives in a non-persistent client side cache (C:\Windows\ccmcache). Linux was created by a bunch of dope-smoking neckbeards and European commies and they have had solid standardized package management for like ten years. I remember taking a Debian Stable install up to Testing, and then down-grading to Stable and then finally just upgrading the whole thing to Unstable. AND EVERYTHING WORKED (MOSTLY). Lets see you try that kind of kernel and user land gymnastics with Windows. Maybe I just have not spent enough supporting Linux to hate it yet but I cannot help but admire the beauty of apt-get update && apt-get upgrade when most of my software deployments means gluing various .EXEs and registry keys together with batch files or PowerShell. It’s 2016 and this is how we are managing software deployments? I feel like I’m taking crazy pills here.

 

Lets look at the IEAK as a specific example since I suspect that’s half the reason I got us into this mess. The quotes from this r/sccm thread are perfect here:

  • “IEAK can’t handle pre reqs cleanly. Also ‘installs’ IE11 and marks it as successful if it fails due to prereqs”
  • “Dittoing this. IEAK was a nightmare.”
  • “IEAK worked fine for us apart from one issue. When installing it would fail to get a return from the WMI installed check of KB2729094 quick enough so it assumed it wasn’t installed and would not complete the IE11 install.”
  • “It turns out that even though the IEAK gave me a setup file it was still reaching out to the Internet to download the main payload for IE”
  • “I will never use IEAK again for an IE11 deployment, mainly for the reason you stated but also the CEIP issue.”

And that’s the supported, “Enterprise” deployment method. If you start digging around on the Internet, you see there are people out there deploying Internet Explorer 11 with Task Sequences, custom batch files, custom PowerShell scripts and the PowerShell Deployment Toolkit. Again, the technical part of me understands that Internet Explorer is a complicated piece of software and that there are reasons it is deployed this way but ultimately if it is easier for me to deploy Firefox with SCCM than Internet Explorer… well that just doesn’t seem right now does it?

Until next time… throw your computer away and go outside. Computers are dumb.