Tag Archives: WMI

SCCM, Asset Intelligence and Adobe SWID Tags

Licensing. It is confusing, constantly changing and expensive. It is that last part that our managers really care about come true-up time and so a request in the format of, “Can you give me a report of all the installs of X and how many licenses of A and B we are using?” comes across your desk. Like many of the requests the come across your desk as a System Administrator these can be deceptively tricky. This post will focus on Adobe’s products.

How many installs of Adobe Acrobat XI do we have?

There are a bunch of canned reports that help you right off the bat under Monitoring – Reporting – Reports – Software – Companies and Products. If you don’t have a Reporting Services Point installed yet then get on it! The following reports are a decent start:

  • Count all inventoried products and versions
  • Count inventoried products and versions for a specific product
  • Count of instances of specific software registered with Add or Remove Programs

You may find that these reports are less accurate that you’d hope. I think of them as the “raw” data and while they are useful they don’t gracefully handle things like the difference between “Adobe Systems” and “Adobe Systems Inc.” and detect those as two separate publishers. Asset Intelligence adds a bit of, well, intelligence and allows you to get reports that are more reflective of the real world state of your endpoints.

Once you get your Asset Intelligence Synchronization Point installed (if you don’t have one already) you need to enable some Hardware Inventory Classes. Each of these incurs a minor performance penalty during the Software Inventory client task so you probably only want to enable the classes you think you will need. I find the SMS_InstalledSoftware and SMS_SoftwareTag classes to be the most useful by far so maybe start there.

You can populate these WMI classes by running the Machine Policy Retrieval & Evaluation Cycle client task followed by the Software Inventory cycle. You should now be able to get some juicy info:

 

Lots of good stuff in there, huh? Incidentally if you need a WMI class that tracks software installs to write PowerShell scripts against SMS_InstalledSoftware is far superior to the Win32_Product class because any queries to Win32_Product will cause installed MSIs to be re-configured (KB974524). This is particularly troublesome if there is a SCCM Configuration Item that is repeatedly doing this (here).

There are some great reports that you get from SMS_InstalledSoftware:

  • Software 0A1 – Summary of Installed Software in a Specific Collection
  • Software 02D – Computers with a specific software installed
  • Software 02E  – Installed software on a specific computer
  • Software 06B – Software by product name

All those reports give you a decent count of how many installs you have of a particular piece of software. That takes care of the first part of the request. How about the second?

 

What kind of installs of Adobe Acrobat XI do we have?

Between 2008 and 2010 Adobe started implementing the ISO/IEC 19770-2 SWID tag standard in their products for licensing purposes. Adobe has actually done a decent job at documenting their SWID tag implementation as well as provided information on how decode the LeID. The SWID tag is an XML file that contains all the relevant licensing information for a particular endpoint, including such goodies as the license type, product type (Standard, Pro, etc.) and the version. This information gets pulled out of the SWID tag and populates the SMS_SoftwareTag class on your clients.

 

That’s a pretty good start but if we create a custom report using the following SQL query we can get something that looks Manager Approved (TM)!

 

Until next time, stay frosty.

Quick and dirty PowerShell snippet to get Dell Service Tag

The new fiscal year is right around the corner for us. This time of year brings all kinds of fun for us Alaskans, spring king salmon runs, our yearly dose of three days worth of good weather and licensing true-up and hardware purchases. Now there’s about a million different ways to skin this particular cat but here’s a quick a dirty method with PowerShell.

 

If you don’t have access to the ridiculously useful Test-NetConnection cmdlet then you probably should upgrade to PowerShell v5 since unlike most Microsoft products PowerShell seems to actually improve with each version but baring that you can just open a TCP socket by instantiating the appropriate .NET object.

 

The slickest way I have ever seen this done though was with SCCM and the Dell Command Integration Suite for System Center which can generate a warranty status report for everything in your SCCM Site by connecting to database, grabbing the all the service tags and then sending that up to Dell’s warranty status API to get all kinds of juicy information like model, service level, ship date, and warranty status. Unfortunately since this was tremendously useful the team overseeing the warranty status web service decommissioned it abruptly back in 2016. Thanks for nothing ya jerks!